Difference between revisions of "Gaud"

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A gaud is a charm or trinket typically found at the end of a [[rosary]]. These could be a [[crucifix]] or other small [[medallion]] depicting a Biblical scene or saint. A spherical type of gaud called a ''nut'' was carved from boxwood or [[hardstone]] and hinged open to reveal intricate carvings of the figures of saints or Biblical scenes and could also hang from a rosary. Sometimes these hidden treasures were made of metal and elaborately [[enamel]]ed.  An entire rosary could be composed of intricately carved nuts.<br/><br/>
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A gaud is a charm or trinket typically found at the end of a [[rosary]]. These could be a crucifixor other small [[medallion]] depicting a Biblical scene or saint. A spherical type of gaud called a ''nut'' was carved from boxwood or [[hardstone]] and hinged open to reveal intricate carvings of the figures of saints or Biblical scenes and could also hang from a rosary. Sometimes these hidden treasures were made of metal and elaborately [[enamel]]ed.  An entire rosary could be composed of intricately carved nuts.<br/><br/>
 
French: ''noix'' or ''grain de chapelet'' <br/><br/>
 
French: ''noix'' or ''grain de chapelet'' <br/><br/>
 
German: ''Betnüsse''
 
German: ''Betnüsse''

Latest revision as of 17:13, 3 January 2013

A gaud is a charm or trinket typically found at the end of a rosary. These could be a crucifixor other small medallion depicting a Biblical scene or saint. A spherical type of gaud called a nut was carved from boxwood or hardstone and hinged open to reveal intricate carvings of the figures of saints or Biblical scenes and could also hang from a rosary. Sometimes these hidden treasures were made of metal and elaborately enameled. An entire rosary could be composed of intricately carved nuts.

French: noix or grain de chapelet

German: Betnüsse

Boxwood Carved Rosary Gaud or Nut. c.1480-1530. © Trustees of the British Museum.
Interior Detail of a Boxwood Carved Rosary Gaud or Nut. c.1480-1530. © Trustees of the British Museum.


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