Difference between revisions of "Flato"

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[[file:Flato Ruby Hear t Brooch.jpg|left|thumb|300px|<center>Flato Heart Brooch.<br/> </center>]]
 
[[file:Flato Ruby Hear t Brooch.jpg|left|thumb|300px|<center>Flato Heart Brooch.<br/> </center>]]
One of the more fascinating jewelers in American jewelry history, Paul Flato designed jewels that were as creative and flamboyant as their creator. Catering to the tastes and whims of the very wealthy, and the stars of Hollywood, Flato flourished at a time when high society dressed to impress and had no qualms in spending large sums on personal adornment. Advertising in the top fashion magazines such as Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, attending and hosting fashion shows, charity events and evening balls, and establishing elegant stores in New York City and Los Angeles, Flato inhabited his client’s world and kept his business relevant and in demand. His subsequent downfall seems all the more shocking, but his optimistic nature and determination have ensured that his story remains imbued with glamour, intrigue and beautiful creations rather than tragedy. Herewith, a brief summary of the rather incredible career and jewelry of Paul Flato.
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One of the more fascinating jewelers in American jewelry history, Paul Flato designed jewels that were as inventive and flamboyant as their creator. Catering to the tastes and whims of the very wealthy, and the stars of Hollywood, Flato flourished at a time when high society dressed to impress and had no qualms in spending large sums on personal adornment. Advertising in top fashion magazines such as Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, attending and hosting fashion shows, charity events and evening balls, and establishing elegant stores in New York City and Los Angeles, Flato inhabited his client’s world, keeping his business relevant and in demand. His subsequent downfall seems all the more shocking, but his optimistic nature and determination ensured that his story remains imbued with glamour, intrigue and beautiful creations. Herewith, a brief summary of the rather incredible career and jewelry of Paul Flato.
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Born in 1900 into a prosperous family in Shiner Texas, Paul Flato enjoyed a  privileged upbringing, exposing him from childhood to a world of elegance and a society that had the means to dress and adorn themselves.  in the fall of 1920, he left Texas as an ambitious young man to study business at Colombia University in New York City. Following his first year at Colombia he was cut off from his family allowance after declining entreaties to return home. Always interested in jewels, Flato took a job at jeweler and watch dealer, Edmund Frisch, to support himself. His outgoing personality served him well, using his wealth of connections he was soon able to branch out on his own, opening a well-appointed salon on W 57th St.
 
   
 
   
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His earliest sales concentrated on increasingly rare matched strands of natural pearls and his other specialty, large diamonds. A prime example of one of Flato's more important strands was sold in 1930 consisting of eighty-five graduated natural pearls clasped by a four carat Golconda diamond. Flato’s most notable diamond supplier in the late 1930s was, a then relatively unknown but ambitious diamond dealer, [[Harry Winston]]. The most famous of their collaborations was the necklace that Flato designed in 1938 to compliment Winston's 125.65 carat Jonker diamond.
Born in 1900 into a prosperous family in Shiner Texas, Paul Flato enjoyed a  privileged upbringing, exposing him from childhood to a world of elegance and to a society that had the means to dress and adorn themselves. He left Texas as an ambitious young man to study business at Colombia University in New York City in the fall of 1920. Completing his first year at Colombia he was cut off from his family allowance after declining entreaties to return home. Always interested in jewels, Flato took a job at jeweler and watch dealer Edmund Frisch to support himself. His outgoing personality served him well and using his wealth of connections he was soon able to branch out on his own, opening a well-appointed salon on W 57th St.
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Flato’s jewelry ran the gamut from elegant, important jewelry to urbane and slyly witty pieces. Central to his enduring legacy was his talent for employing gifted designers, including several high society notables.  His chief designer, Adolph Klety specialized in creating the more formal platinum and diamond jewelry, rendering floral and naturalistic flexible jewels in a style that Flato memorably described as “Drippy.George Headley, another Flato featured designer, was known for creating fanciful gold jewelry and accessories. Elizabeth Bray describes a particularly imaginative piece designed by Headley in her book on Paul Flato:
His earliest sales concentrated on increasingly rare matched strands of natural pearls and large diamonds. An example of one of his most important strands was one sold in 1930 consisting of 85 graduated natural pearls clasped by a 4 carat Golconda diamond.
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Diamonds were also a specialty and one of Flato’s most notable diamond suppliers in the late 1930s was a then relatively unknown but ambitious diamond dealer, [[Harry Winston]]. The most famous of their collaborations was the necklace that Flato designed in 1938 for the 125.65 carat Jonker diamond that Winston had acquired.
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{{quote|His designs were often theatrical and conceptual. One piece that he created was a necklace of particularly romantic design. The giver of the necklace would write a love letter on a sheet of gold, the jeweler would then “tear” the sheet into fragments and assemble them on a chain. The receiver of the necklace could reassemble the pieces together to read the original letter. <ref>Bray p.47</ref>}}<br/>
Flato’s jewelry ran the gamut from elegant, important jewelry to urbane and slyly witty pieces. Central to his enduring legacy was his talent for employing gifted designers including several high society notables.  His chief designer, Adolph Klety specialized in creating the more formal platinum and diamond jewelry rendering floral and naturalistic flexible jewels in a style that Flato memorably described as “Drippy”. George Headley, another of his main designers, was known for creating fanciful gold jewelry and accessories. Elizabeth Bray describes a particularly imaginative piece designed by Headley in her book on Paul Flato:{{quote|His designs were often theatrical and conceptual. One piece that he created was a necklace of particularly romantic design. The giver of the necklace would write a love letter on a sheet of gold, the jeweler would then “tear” the sheet into fragments and assemble them on a chain. The receiver of the necklace could reassemble the pieces together to read the original letter. <ref>Bray p.47</ref>}}<br/>
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While Flato did not have the design training and drafting skills of Klety and Headley, he had a firm sense of how he wanted his pieces to look and gave instruction and guidance accordingly. His colored gemstone pieces also reflect a strong sense of striking color combinations.
 
While Flato did not have the design training and drafting skills of Klety and Headley, he had a firm sense of how he wanted his pieces to look and gave instruction and guidance accordingly. His colored gemstone pieces also reflect a strong sense of striking color combinations.

Revision as of 14:31, 26 February 2013

One of the more fascinating jewelers in American jewelry history, Paul Flato designed jewels that were as inventive and flamboyant as their creator. Catering to the tastes and whims of the very wealthy, and the stars of Hollywood, Flato flourished at a time when high society dressed to impress and had no qualms in spending large sums on personal adornment. Advertising in top fashion magazines such as Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, attending and hosting fashion shows, charity events and evening balls, and establishing elegant stores in New York City and Los Angeles, Flato inhabited his client’s world, keeping his business relevant and in demand. His subsequent downfall seems all the more shocking, but his optimistic nature and determination ensured that his story remains imbued with glamour, intrigue and beautiful creations. Herewith, a brief summary of the rather incredible career and jewelry of Paul Flato.

Born in 1900 into a prosperous family in Shiner Texas, Paul Flato enjoyed a privileged upbringing, exposing him from childhood to a world of elegance and a society that had the means to dress and adorn themselves. in the fall of 1920, he left Texas as an ambitious young man to study business at Colombia University in New York City. Following his first year at Colombia he was cut off from his family allowance after declining entreaties to return home. Always interested in jewels, Flato took a job at jeweler and watch dealer, Edmund Frisch, to support himself. His outgoing personality served him well, using his wealth of connections he was soon able to branch out on his own, opening a well-appointed salon on W 57th St.

His earliest sales concentrated on increasingly rare matched strands of natural pearls and his other specialty, large diamonds. A prime example of one of Flato's more important strands was sold in 1930 consisting of eighty-five graduated natural pearls clasped by a four carat Golconda diamond. Flato’s most notable diamond supplier in the late 1930s was, a then relatively unknown but ambitious diamond dealer, Harry Winston. The most famous of their collaborations was the necklace that Flato designed in 1938 to compliment Winston's 125.65 carat Jonker diamond.

Flato’s jewelry ran the gamut from elegant, important jewelry to urbane and slyly witty pieces. Central to his enduring legacy was his talent for employing gifted designers, including several high society notables. His chief designer, Adolph Klety specialized in creating the more formal platinum and diamond jewelry, rendering floral and naturalistic flexible jewels in a style that Flato memorably described as “Drippy.” George Headley, another Flato featured designer, was known for creating fanciful gold jewelry and accessories. Elizabeth Bray describes a particularly imaginative piece designed by Headley in her book on Paul Flato:


His designs were often theatrical and conceptual. One piece that he created was a necklace of particularly romantic design. The giver of the necklace would write a love letter on a sheet of gold, the jeweler would then “tear” the sheet into fragments and assemble them on a chain. The receiver of the necklace could reassemble the pieces together to read the original letter. [1]

While Flato did not have the design training and drafting skills of Klety and Headley, he had a firm sense of how he wanted his pieces to look and gave instruction and guidance accordingly. His colored gemstone pieces also reflect a strong sense of striking color combinations.
Cite error: <ref> tags exist, but no <references/> tag was found

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