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Victorian Silver

The industrial revolution was booming during this period and of course, this had a vast impact on jewelry manufacturing. Silver was extensively used in stamping and die striking. This technique developed in the Late Georgian period and was perfected right through the Victorian era.

After Victoria and Albert bought Balmoral in Scotland in 1848 Scottish agate jewelry became a trend. These items were predominantly executed in silver in good Northern European tradition.

The Arts and Crafts sub-period, which was essentially a reaction to the above-described industrialization of jewelry manufacturing, at the end of the Victorian period, saw another trend in silver jewelry. The design of Arts and Crafts Jewelry was of primary importance. The intrinsic value of the metal and gemstones was really of secondary importance. In Arts and Crafts jewelry, cabochon cuts, usually bezel-set, were preferred over faceted stones and silver was preferred over gold.

Showcase

Engraved Silver Brooch Inlaid with Shaped Panels of Variegated Grey Agate and Set with Cabochon Citrines, in the Form of a Celtic Ring-Brooch.
1873

© The Trustees of the British Museum.

Cuff bracelet
Late 19th Century.

Courtesy of Lang Antiques.

Silver Over Gold Diamond Chandelier Earrings
Mid 19th Century

Courtesy of Lang Antiques.

Ebonite Half-Hunter Cased Cylinder Watch with Chatelaine and Key.
1855-1865

© The Trustees of the British Museum

Openwork Oxidized Silver Bracelet with 18 Applied Gold Lions’ Masks and Borders of Gilded Beads on Both Edges.
1875-1890 (circa)

© The Trustees of the British Museum

Pierced and Chased Silver and Parcel-Gilt Pendant in the Form of a Standing Female Figure with Flowing Draperies.
1900-1905 (circa)

© The Trustees of the British Museum.

Celtic Cross from 19th Century Scotland.

Courtesy of Lang Antiques.

Cast and Chased Oxidised Silver Brooch of Octagonal Form, the Openwork Border Set with Eight Square-Cut Garnets, with a Grotesque Mask Surrounded by Foliage in the Centre.
1870 (circa)

© The Trustees of the British Museum.